• Frontiers

    Resilient as the landscape, Kiowa Cranson and his way of life endure in the high deserts of Northern New Mexico.


    Photo By Jeremy Wade Shockley


  • Frontiers

    Sterlin, youngest of the Mitchell family, catches a ride on the ranch truck at dusk.


    Photo By Jeremy Wade Shockley


  • Frontiers

    Resilient as the landscape, Kiowa Cranson and his way of life endure in the high deserts of Northern New Mexico.


    Photo By Jeremy Wade Shockley


  • Frontiers

    Unloading horses, father and son work together on the San Cristobal Ranch, where the young Mitchell boys carry on the family tradition.


    Photo By Jeremy Wade Shockley


  • Frontiers

    Grant Mitchell brings in the remuda at day’s end. Mitchell manages the ranch alongside his wife, Connie, and their sons, Trey and Sterlin. Mitchell has served as the ranch manager of the Singleton Ranches Horse Division for 17 years.


    Photo By Jeremy Wade Shockley


  • Frontiers

    The Mitchells’ eldest son, Trey, sharpens his roping skills during a break from work.


    Photo By Jeremy Wade Shockley


  • Frontiers

    Grant Mitchell and his son Trey work horses at daybreak on the historic San Cristobal Ranch located in the mountains outside of Santa Fe, N.M. The 81,000-acre working cattle ranch serves as the headquarters for the Singleton Ranches Horse Division.


    Photo By Jeremy Wade Shockley

Life and Land
Despite spanning nearly half the country, the American West—its land, people, and cultures—is a territory and way of life unknown to many. Through his photography, New Mexico native Jeremy Wade Shockley aims to make it a little more accessible.  

“It’s a culture that’s changing and not as readily available as it used to be,” he says, “and I want people to see that it’s still alive and thriving.” 

Shockley started taking pictures while in the Peace Corps, where he learned that the more he was involved with a community, the better his photography became. It’s a practice he applied back home, immersing himself in the various cultures of the West.  

In this series of photographs, Shockley trains his lens on the historic San Cristobal Ranch of Northern New Mexico, where multiple generations uphold cowboy traditions and manage the land. The inextricable relationship between life and land is a connection that inspires much of Shockley’s work.   

“We need to regard the landscape with respect,” he says. “After all, it shaped the culture of the West. You can’t have one without the other. I want people to see that through my work, particularly if they’ve never been to the American West.”

Copyright 2017 by Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc. an Active Interest Media company